Legalisation of documents from Nepal for use in the Netherlands

To use a document from Nepal in the Netherlands, you must first have it legalised by the Nepalese Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Then you need a legalisation from the Netherlands embassy in New Delhi, India.

Due to the corona virus, you cannot have foreign documents legalised at most embassies or consulates-general until further notice. Please check the contact page of the embassy or consulate-general to see if and from when it is possible to have your document legalised. Don't see a start date on the contact page? Then it is not yet possible. Do you only need to have your documents legalised by the local authorities? Then check with the local authorities if that is possible.

Who can have documents legalised?

Anyone who has one or more documents from Nepal can have them legalised for use in any part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands:

  • the European part of the Netherlands
  • Aruba
  • Bonaire
  • Curaçao
  • Saba
  • St Eustatius
  • St Maarten

Requirements for your document

Your document must be original and complete. If the document refers to other documents or annexes, these must be included.

Translation of your document

If your document is not in English, you will need a translation in English, French, German or Dutch. If the sworn translator isn't registered in the Netherlands, you will have to have the translation legalised by the Nepalese Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Netherlands embassy in New Delhi, India, as well.

Which documents can be legalised?

You can have various documents legalised, such as diplomas and certificates. The most common documents are extracts from civil status records. In Nepal, births and other events must be registered with the civil status records office, usually within a set period of time. If registration takes place after this time, the municipality draws up a delayed certificate. You can get the following certificates from the authorities:

  • an official copy of a birth certificate (if you were born before 1977, have a delayed birth certificate drawn up first)
  • a certificate of unmarried status
  • an official copy of a divorce certificate
  • an official copy of a death certificate

You can get these documents from 3 different authorities. They can also draw up a delayed certificate for you:

  • Village Development Committee (VDC)
  • Municipality Office
  • Metropolitan or Sub-Metropolitan City Office

Official copy of a marriage certificate

You can get this document from the following authorities:

  • Village Development Committee (VDC)
  • Municipality Office
  • Metropolitan or Sub-Metropolitan City Office
  • District Administration Office (DAO)

Where can you have your documents legalised?

First have your document and, if applicable, your legalisation legalised by the Nepalese Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Then have your document(s) legalised by the Netherlands embassy in New Delhi, India.

After these legalisation procedures, you can use your document in the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

How can you make an appointment?

Schedule an appointment via the online appointment system of the embassy in New Delhi.

If you want to be sure that the embassy can legalise your document, first send a scan of the document(s) to be legalised via e-mail to the embassy. If there is data on the back of the document, scan it too. If the embassy informs you that your document can be legalised, you can make an appointment via the online appointment system.

When can you pick up your document?

The processing time of a legalisation is normally 1 working day (submit today, pick up the next working day).

How much will it cost?

Please check the overview of consular fees in India for the costs and the payment method.

Assistance from the CDC in The Hague

The Consular Service Centre (CDC) can help Dutch nationals apply for documents or have documents legalised in Nepal.

Verification of your document

The stamp or sticker on your document means only that the correct signature is on your document. Legalisation does not prove that the content is correct or that the document is authentic. A municipality in the Netherlands, the Immigration and Naturalisation Service (IND) or another authority may decide to check this.